The Blue Lagoon: Healing Waters of Iceland

The Blue Lagoon: Healing Waters of Iceland
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Iceland draws travelers from across the world for many reasons. Located between the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, Iceland’s rugged beauty offers uncrowded landscape, geothermal energy, natural hot springs, geysers and volcanoes.

The island nation offers many opportunities for adventure-seekers, such as ice climbing and exploring the largely untouched terrain. Best of all, after all that adventure, Iceland has the perfect way to relax – a visit to the Blue Lagoon.

Iceland’s Blue Lagoon geothermal spa is the result of water from a nearby geothermal power plant. The water is heated and replenished every 40 hours. This man-made lagoon is thought to help improve skin conditions of those who bathe in its creamy blue waters. The water’s color is due to the high mineral content and the location near lava and rich soil. There is a reason it was named one of National Geographic’s “25 Wonders of the World.”
Bathing in naturally heated baths is an Icelandic tradition. With a history of geothermal energy, Iceland enjoys a culture that has easy access to heated, mineral rich waters.

The Blue Lagoon provides a range of service fees, ranging from standard to luxury services. Visitors can find everything from spa services to guided tours. There are even in water massages.

People traveling to the Blue Lagoon can choose to bus from nearby hotels or other accommodations. There is also

the option to stay at the Blue Lagoon Clinic hotel, which is a 10-minute walk, and admission to the lagoon is included in the room price.

The Blue Lagoon is open daily year round. It is located between Iceland’s International Airport and Reykjavik and is a 20-minute drive. Tour operators provide scheduled transfers to the lagoon. The Blue Lagoon also offers luggage storage, if you want to get right off your plane and relax.

Iceland is also a great spot to view the Northern Lights. The dark months of September to April offer a prime opportunity to see the Aurora Borealis.

The official language of Iceland is Icelandic, but English and Danish are required in schools and are commonly used, so travelers should not experience a huge language barrier. French, German, Swedish and Norwegian are also used.


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